Work at Height Prosecutions, fatal fall from scaffold
Apr
28

Work at height prosecutions

The co-directors of a former London scaffolding firm have faced work at height prosecutions after a trainee worker fell to his death from a poorly constructed scaffold in Westminster. The trainee (SH), who was aged twenty, sustained multiple head injuries in the six-metre fall at Whitehall Place on 24 April 2008. He died in hospital the following day.

This is another example of the long list of work at height prosecutions. AG and JB were responsible for the scaffold and for the young worker’s safety. The pair were sentenced (Southwark Crown Court) after an investigation by the HSE found serious failings with the structure, and with their management of the work taking place on it. The court heard that SH was working as a trainee scaffolder for AGS Ltd (which went into liquidation but was owned by AG and JB).

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Machinery Safety Prosecution
Apr
25

The HSE carried out inspections at two premises belonging to a Tyne and Wear floral foam manufacturers, SOUK, following an incident in which a machine operator suffered a partial amputation of her left middle finger and a broken left index finger while operating a milling machine. Sunderland Magistrates’ Court heard that at the time of the incident (09 May 2012) the HSE found there were no protective measures in place to stop workers getting too close to a specific dangerous moving part of the milling machine.

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Work at Height Prosecutions, April 2014
Apr
25

Most work at height prosecutions are avoidable (by taking sensible and appropriate measures). A roofing firm and its managing director have been fined after they allowed workers onto a house roof to use a jet washer without safety measures in place.

After being alerted by a member of the public, the HSE visited the premises on the same day and issued a Prohibition Notice ordering the workers from IQRS to come down until appropriate precautions were in place (such as scaffolding). This has added to the list of work at height prosecutions. Continue reading